Unless you’ve injected yourself with copious amounts of morphine over the years, it’s quite clear that movies based on games have generally been awful, time and time again. It’s a depressing trend, but one that makes sense. Hollywood sees anything remotely popular as a cash cow; a chance to exploit its popularity by ‘cashing in’ on it and hoping to lure in fans, without putting in any consideration into the film itself. This leads to bad casting, directing, budgets, and of course, popcorn stains on the silver screen from previous viewers who hurled their snacks at the screen in a fit of rage.

But often it’s actually the game itself that is the fundamental problem. The simple truth is that some games can be translated into film format better than others. After all, games are a unique form of media and artistic expression that provides experiences far different from films, books and music. As a result, some games, as good as they are, just cannot be converted into cinematic form without sacrificing major elements of the source material or butchering it altogether. The problem is that a lot of people still haven’t wrapped their heads around this. Therefore, I give you this list of games that should simply be left alone and are not worth passing through the filter of cinema. I’ve tried to include some of the most notable and acclaimed games as examples, because those are the ones that money-hungry executives want to get their grubby little mitts on the most and could cause the most internal damage to fans.

5. Call of Duty

 At first glance, Call of Duty sounds like the most marketable franchise ever. It’s got explosions, guns, enough patriotism to choke Captain America, and of course, interesting and chaotic battle scenes that serve as great set pieces. That sound you’re hearing is Michael Bay typing a proposal letter to studios. All joking aside, Call of Duty has actually been considered in the past for a film translation, around the same time a Guitar Hero TV series (shudder) was announced. We haven’t really heard any development past that, but it’s probably best to keep it that way. When you think about it, Call of Duty has never really focused on story or character development. Its sole purpose has always been putting the player in explosive combat scenarios in the safety and comfort of their living room; In other words, providing a polished, immersive action experience. Characters are usually relegated to squad mates in battle and are not explored upon in order to focus on action. For a game, that might be enough. For a film, however, we expect a bit more. War movies like Saving Private Ryan and Black Hawk Down have provided exciting action while still exploring complex themes and developing likeable characters. That means a Call of Duty film would have a lot to live up to. And considering how most studios would treat it, it won’t get that kind of attention. Chances are it will turn out to be just another action movie. And do we really need that? Especially since we already have the games to give us great action experiences? Azanog the Walrus God says no. And I think he speaks for everyone.

4. Mario/Zelda/Metroid

 These are arguably the big three franchises that bear the glorious Nintendo label. So why should they be tucked away and hidden from the world of film? Well, for exactly the same reasons Team Ninja screwed up Metroid: Other M (See: Completely mishandling a franchise). None of the protagonists or any of the other characters talk in any of these games with the exception of Link’s famous “HYAHHHH!!!” or Mario’s “It’s-a me, Mario!” As a result, adding any kind of a voice or characterization to them is likely to piss off at least some fans. Furthermore, all of these games were born from gameplay mechanics. With Mario, side-scroller platforming. With Zelda, open-world gameplay. And Metroid gave us exploration-based gameplay. Sure, the stories and settings in these games were still appealing, but they were always kept simple, so much so to the point where every game basically has the same recycled plot. Do you start to see why these wouldn’t work as films? Besides, these franchises are held in too high regard for us to be meddling with them anytime soon.

3. Shadow of the Colossus (possible spoilers)

 Prepare to soil your limited edition Colossus undies, fans. The infamous CEOs and suits of Hollywood are already planning to make a movie based on this beloved game. However, I can not stress enough how bad of an idea this is. In the game, fighting the Colossi was a central component of the game. Each time you killed one, you really got the sense that you have defeated a giant, and that you have made a significant impact on the world around you. You were questioning your own actions as you continuously defeated them. But you somehow kept going because of the promise of resurrection for the Wanderer’s dead wife. You were curious to see what happened next. And by the end, you looked back and felt a huge sprout of guilt and realized that you may have been the villain yourself. And yet you completely supported that idea by playing through all of those actions in the first place. So can a film extract those same emotions from the same story? Hell no! SotC had the best kind of game story; one that required it to be a game in order to be good. Simply watching the hero in the movie slay all of the Colossi one by one and then giving us the same ending that the game had won’t exactly get us to build shrines for it. And did I mention that the director of Street Fighter: Legend of Chun Li is set for the project? Sink in peril, mortals.

2. Any full fledged RPG. Seriously, any.

 Yes, this does seem like a stretch, but just think about it. What is the main selling point of most RPGs? That’s right; the ability to create your own character and do whatever you see fit. You essentially create your own identity in the game. You choose how the character behaves, develops, and interacts with the world around him. There are multiple choices you can make, and they all have consequences that can be pretty deep, and it’s fun to replay RPGs, making different choices with different characters each time. Lastly, the game worlds are unrestrictive and sprawling, letting you choose where to go, what to do, when to do it, how you’ll do it, and what order you’ll do it in. Sounds great doesn’t it? Well it’s also something that can absolutely not be done in a film. Films are linear affairs with preset characters that develop in a specific way and are essentially the director’s identity. Do you see what I mean? Sure, some RPGs like Mass Effect and Final Fantasy could stand on their own as films because you play as (mostly) predefined characters and there are still clear story structures to follow. However, RPGs like Oblivion, Fallout, Stalker, Dragon Age, and World of Warcraft are built around the concept of going, doing, and being whatever you want in a world influenced by your actions. And you just can’t replicate that in a movie. So why even try? Also, bonus: Far Cry 2. Not really an RPG, I know. But how would you turn that into a movie? You wouldn’t.

1. Half-life series (specifically #2)

 And finally, the crowning jewel of this list. People have already gone to Youtube and started making an abundance of fake Half-life movie trailers and even writing potential scripts for the film. I think I even remember Uwe Boll asking Valve for the film rights at one point. Of course they declined; otherwise I’d be pretty sure there is no God. But they also stated that they don’t think a Half-life film would work. And I agree. Just think for a minute about how the world of Half-life 2 was presented to you. Much like Gordon Freeman himself, coming out of stasis and entering City 17, you too knew absolutely nothing about the city as you exited the train and entered the first level. The story itself was pretty standard; aliens come to earth, enslave mankind, and someone has to stop them. However, it was your interaction with the characters and discovery of the game world that made the story truly interesting and drew you in to the plot and characters. Slowly but surely, you pieced together details about the setting and how it came to be. Not to mention the technology that is used and the way the characters behave. That’s all well and good, but how in the world would you translate that into film form? Keep in mind that there were no cutscenes in the game whatsoever and the protagonist never spoke, not to mention it was entirely in first person. Mix that all together and you’ve got a formula that can only work in a video game. Don’t believe me? Check out the trailer for the CGI fan film production of Half-life 2. Well produced, for sure. But something feels off. Seeing Gordon Freeman in third person in a film like this just feels awkward. It’s just not true to the game. Even a sidestory to the Half-life mythos would not fare very well for a film. The actual plot of the game is rather generic and unremarkable if you think about it. It’s the EXECUTION, however, that made the story great. Therefore exploring the world of Half-life in film form is meaningless. Half-life 1 and 2 were great games, and they should stay that way. As great games.

 

Well, there you have it; Games that will hopefully never be made into films if we’re lucky. What do you guys think? Are there ways some of these films could work? Or do you too agree that they should be left alone and like fine soups, should not be subject to alteration from the chefs of Hollywood?

 

Michael Urban
Now an occasional contributer, Michael Urban is the former Editor-in-Chief at OnlySP and has the nickname "Breadcrab" for reasons his therapist still doesn't understand. From the moment he first got hacked in Runescape, he's been uninterested in multiplayer games and has pursued the beauty of the single-player experience, especially in terms of story and creative design. His hobbies include reading, writing, singing in the shower, pretending to be productive, and providing info and feedback regarding the games industry. It is an industry, right? You can ask him a question or send him spam at [email protected] Also, follow him on Twitter or the terrorists win. (@MichaelUrban1)

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51 Comments

  1. Mario has already been made into a film. Think it was Bob Hoskins who starred as Mario.

    1. and it was awful.

  2. Mario has already been made into a film. Think it was Bob Hoskins who starred as Mario.

    1. and it was awful.

  3. I dont understand people&#039s fascination with Half Life 2. It was mediocre at best.

    1. terrible gamer

      1. yo-lady-is-a-bad-gamer

    2. I&#039m not even going to dignify that with a response.

    3. i agree, its boring and standard in every way. they only love it cuz of nostalgia which is like gamer aids

  4. I dont understand people's fascination with Half Life 2. It was mediocre at best.

    1. terrible gamer

      1. yo-lady-is-a-bad-gamer

    2. I'm not even going to dignify that with a response.

    3. i agree, its boring and standard in every way. they only love it cuz of nostalgia which is like gamer aids

      1. Yes. It was universally acclaimed and named GOTY by dozens of publications because of nostalgia.

  5. Half-life has the same problem call of duty does. The plot only advances in little 2-5 minute sections throughout the game. The rest is just hours of killing faceless enemies on your way from point a to b. except in half-life 2 you might find a puzzle or two on the way. A movie&#039s plot needs some meat, it can&#039t be 95% violent filler or you get something like Battle LA.

  6. Half-life has the same problem call of duty does. The plot only advances in little 2-5 minute sections throughout the game. The rest is just hours of killing faceless enemies on your way from point a to b. except in half-life 2 you might find a puzzle or two on the way. A movie's plot needs some meat, it can't be 95% violent filler or you get something like Battle LA.

  7. Now, the only one I disagree with is Fallout. Take a look at Nuka-break, a well done fan-series, set in the Fallout world, on youtube. The best thing about the Fallout universe is that it&#039s more of a setting than a story, and making up a character, and putting him through events that never where actually in the storyline of the games, makes an entertaining fresh expireance, and all the director and writers have to stick to is setting and props. Giving an honerable mention to the Vault Dweller, the Initiate, or the Courier, as just a nameless faceless person doing deeds won&#039t piss off any fans, but seeing your favorite enemies and factions working for or against the main protagonist(s) would make many fans happy because it&#039s a new story in the universe that many fans and, I think, possibly non-gamers would find enjoyable.

  8. Now, the only one I disagree with is Fallout. Take a look at Nuka-break, a well done fan-series, set in the Fallout world, on youtube. The best thing about the Fallout universe is that it's more of a setting than a story, and making up a character, and putting him through events that never where actually in the storyline of the games, makes an entertaining fresh expireance, and all the director and writers have to stick to is setting and props. Giving an honerable mention to the Vault Dweller, the Initiate, or the Courier, as just a nameless faceless person doing deeds won't piss off any fans, but seeing your favorite enemies and factions working for or against the main protagonist(s) would make many fans happy because it's a new story in the universe that many fans and, I think, possibly non-gamers would find enjoyable.

  9. I think the TF141 aspect of Modern Warfare 2 would make an excellent movie. I always have. With how the war was started and all, it&#039s total cinematic material. There&#039d have to be a little bit of tweaking, with the jumping, and a little bit of dramatic extension but I think it&#039d be successful.

  10. I dont think this is completely true. I think Variations of game franchises can be made into films. Look at Final Fantasy: Advent Children. That was a great story

    1. I forgot all about Advent Children. Holy shit, was that great.

  11. I think the TF141 aspect of Modern Warfare 2 would make an excellent movie. I always have. With how the war was started and all, it's total cinematic material. There'd have to be a little bit of tweaking, with the jumping, and a little bit of dramatic extension but I think it'd be successful.

    1. I agree with that in some ways. Your idea sounds tempting but I doubt the fools in Hollywood will resist the temptation to butcher the whole thing. They’ll have so many changes in the script that it won’t be recognizable. Just look at the Bourne Identity series. They have nothing to do with the books and just took advantage of the name to sell the movies (the second and third were horrible.) If they

  12. I dont think this is completely true. I think Variations of game franchises can be made into films. Look at Final Fantasy: Advent Children. That was a great story

    1. I forgot all about Advent Children. Holy shit, was that great.

  13. It&#039s not a video game, but trying to turn the board game Battleship into a movie was quite a disaster! What were the aliens doing there? All action, no plot! Even the lame attempt to turn the fire mission search for the alien ship into the calling out of grids more complicated than "B4…" was a nod to the game, but really very lame!

  14. It's not a video game, but trying to turn the board game Battleship into a movie was quite a disaster! What were the aliens doing there? All action, no plot! Even the lame attempt to turn the fire mission search for the alien ship into the calling out of grids more complicated than "B4…" was a nod to the game, but really very lame!

  15. You could totally make a fallout movie….just who want to make it?

  16. You could totally make a fallout movie….just who want to make it?

  17. What about Fable? Sure, you create your character to your liking, but everyone plays as the same character, it has the same plot, and I think it could be a lot of fun.

  18. What about Fable? Sure, you create your character to your liking, but everyone plays as the same character, it has the same plot, and I think it could be a lot of fun.

  19. It would make a lot more sense to try working from something completely linear with a simple fixed sequence of events, such as Astyanax or Ninja Gaiden or even Master Blaster. (The juvenile novelization of Master Blaster wasn&#039t too bad, though it took rather too many liberties with the game.)

    You&#039ll note that every one of the games mentioned is from the old 8-bit NES gray box, for which there&#039s a very good reason. The games from before that time were nearly all point-based (get the highest score possible for bragging rights over everyone else who&#039s ever played the game), and as such had little to no plot whatsoever. Trying to make a movie out of them would be like trying to write a story about a game of checkers; not about the players (who might have interesting personalities and histories) mind you, just the game. When there&#039s no story, it doesn&#039t matter whether the movie you make has a decent story or not; it&#039s not really an adaptation. That&#039s why the Battleship movie (for one) wasn&#039t really much good.

    As for games that came out after the 8-bit NES, they have the opposite problem: too much story. The Chrono Trigger RPG is quite possibly one of the best stories ever told in a video game, but how could you possibly adapt that into a two-hour or even three-hour movie without seriously abridging the whole thing? Honestly, how many games with a story from the old 16-bit SNES could possibly fit into the standard feature-length movie format, even assuming you can cut out a significant portion of the level-grinding and gratuitous battling from the game for the adaptation? No matter what you do, you&#039ll have to leave out something the players wanted to see for which they&#039ll scream bloody murder, and anyone who isn&#039t a player is unlikely to be interested in a movie on the basis of things the fans liked about it. Then too, as the author notes, just about every RPG made since the SNES has been increasingly complicated and non-linear. You can&#039t win.

    On the other hand, those old linear 8-bit NES games had just enough story to justify the player&#039s continued progress and no more, and as such would allow anyone who adapted one of them into a movie to keep all of the original story from the game and yet add in subplots and extrapolations that would be a pleasant surprise to the players while also appealing to a broader audience of people who just like a good story. For instance, Astyanax is an otherwise forgettable game starring an ordinary 16-year-old boy with a funny name from Greek mythology who gets sucked into a fantasy world where humans have miraculous powers (of course) and is called upon to rescue a princess (of course) from an evil wizard trying to take over the world (of course). About the only twist in the original story is that his love interest at the end turns out to be the little fairy girl companion who accompanied him on most of his adventure rather than the princess he was rescuing.

    Now imagine what you could do with a story like that in a movie adaptation: you could explore the kid&#039s character, his family, his academic background, why he bothered to rescue the princess, and what people will think when he introduces his strange new girlfriend from another world to them. She&#039s got no money, no birth certificate, no ID, no parents, and no legitimate records of her past whatsoever, and where&#039s she going to stay? A movie adaptation could really flesh out Astyanax and the other characters and answer all these lingering questions, while still having plenty of action for kids who are just there to see some violence. (Playing the game basically consisted of cutting your way through the enemy hordes to the evil overlord and killing him, after all.)

    Speaking of video game movies, the only watchable one I&#039d say actually came withing spitting distance of being a decent adaptation was the Prince of Persia movie. The trouble is, other than having a vaguely Arabic setting and showing the titular character doing some acrobatic leaping and climbing just like the one in the game, there&#039s very little to tie it to the original game story; which is hardly surprising since virtually the whole plot consisted of "Escape the dungeon so you can rescue the princess from the evil wizard holding her captive." It&#039s actually a pretty decent movie on its own merits, but I can see why it didn&#039t exactly interest many gamers when it was released.

  20. It would make a lot more sense to try working from something completely linear with a simple fixed sequence of events, such as Astyanax or Ninja Gaiden or even Master Blaster. (The juvenile novelization of Master Blaster wasn't too bad, though it took rather too many liberties with the game.)

    You'll note that every one of the games mentioned is from the old 8-bit NES gray box, for which there's a very good reason. The games from before that time were nearly all point-based (get the highest score possible for bragging rights over everyone else who's ever played the game), and as such had little to no plot whatsoever. Trying to make a movie out of them would be like trying to write a story about a game of checkers; not about the players (who might have interesting personalities and histories) mind you, just the game. When there's no story, it doesn't matter whether the movie you make has a decent story or not; it's not really an adaptation. That's why the Battleship movie (for one) wasn't really much good.

    As for games that came out after the 8-bit NES, they have the opposite problem: too much story. The Chrono Trigger RPG is quite possibly one of the best stories ever told in a video game, but how could you possibly adapt that into a two-hour or even three-hour movie without seriously abridging the whole thing? Honestly, how many games with a story from the old 16-bit SNES could possibly fit into the standard feature-length movie format, even assuming you can cut out a significant portion of the level-grinding and gratuitous battling from the game for the adaptation? No matter what you do, you'll have to leave out something the players wanted to see for which they'll scream bloody murder, and anyone who isn't a player is unlikely to be interested in a movie on the basis of things the fans liked about it. Then too, as the author notes, just about every RPG made since the SNES has been increasingly complicated and non-linear. You can't win.

    On the other hand, those old linear 8-bit NES games had just enough story to justify the player's continued progress and no more, and as such would allow anyone who adapted one of them into a movie to keep all of the original story from the game and yet add in subplots and extrapolations that would be a pleasant surprise to the players while also appealing to a broader audience of people who just like a good story. For instance, Astyanax is an otherwise forgettable game starring an ordinary 16-year-old boy with a funny name from Greek mythology who gets sucked into a fantasy world where humans have miraculous powers (of course) and is called upon to rescue a princess (of course) from an evil wizard trying to take over the world (of course). About the only twist in the original story is that his love interest at the end turns out to be the little fairy girl companion who accompanied him on most of his adventure rather than the princess he was rescuing.

    Now imagine what you could do with a story like that in a movie adaptation: you could explore the kid's character, his family, his academic background, why he bothered to rescue the princess, and what people will think when he introduces his strange new girlfriend from another world to them. She's got no money, no birth certificate, no ID, no parents, and no legitimate records of her past whatsoever, and where's she going to stay? A movie adaptation could really flesh out Astyanax and the other characters and answer all these lingering questions, while still having plenty of action for kids who are just there to see some violence. (Playing the game basically consisted of cutting your way through the enemy hordes to the evil overlord and killing him, after all.)

    Speaking of video game movies, the only watchable one I'd say actually came withing spitting distance of being a decent adaptation was the Prince of Persia movie. The trouble is, other than having a vaguely Arabic setting and showing the titular character doing some acrobatic leaping and climbing just like the one in the game, there's very little to tie it to the original game story; which is hardly surprising since virtually the whole plot consisted of "Escape the dungeon so you can rescue the princess from the evil wizard holding her captive." It's actually a pretty decent movie on its own merits, but I can see why it didn't exactly interest many gamers when it was released.

  21. The problem with game movies as I see it is the liberties they take with the original story. Some games would translate better than others, those magic ones with just the right amount of story not too much or to little. The problem come when games already have a great story, and a movie company decides to cash in on that. Its all about the money, and the people who decide to make them film don&#039t give a rats ass about the game. They are just looking for the payout, exploiting the popularity of the brand name to drive sales. The Resident Evil franchise is a shining example of this. Without the connection to the games, the movies would have been amazing. the concept was great.. it simply had nothing to do with the game other than character names and a few creatures ideas. Granted, the story of the games wasn&#039t that complex, at least not until later games in the series, but the movies, while popular, are obviously just a branding concept, like Gatorade gum. (Look it up, it existed, and went over about as well as you think it would.)
    The next problem you get the artistic people involved in the scripting and filming. These people are hired by a company who doesn&#039t care what they do to the source material, as long as it looks good. They don&#039t wanna do something that has been done before, and decide to put their own twist to it, making it feel more of an original idea to them. the end result is a bastardized version of the original concept. Turns out that the only people who like the movies are those who aren&#039t gamers and have no idea what the original was like.
    My opinion, if you are going to make a game movie, then for the love of god find a producer, directer, art director, and writing team that are GAMERS and are actually fans of the source material. Then we get something like Peter Jackson did with the Lord of the Rings movies, instead another awful Bloodrayne bomb.

    1. Very true. If the people involved in the project don&#039t actually care for the source material their film is based on, it&#039s practically guaranteed to piss fans off. And if they don&#039t actually care for making good films in general, then it&#039ll probably piss everyone off. XD

      I think that with time, more and more passionate gamers will find their way into the film industry and start heading these film productions themselves. After all, gaming as a hobby is growing at a rapid pace and influencing more people each year, not to mention we&#039re now living through the first generation that has grown up with video games.

      Who knows? The upcoming Assassin&#039s Creed, Need for Speed and Splinter Cell films might be good. Even if they aren&#039t, I don&#039t think we&#039re TOO far from decent game-based films becoming a regular occurrence.

  22. The problem with game movies as I see it is the liberties they take with the original story. Some games would translate better than others, those magic ones with just the right amount of story not too much or to little. The problem come when games already have a great story, and a movie company decides to cash in on that. Its all about the money, and the people who decide to make them film don't give a rats ass about the game. They are just looking for the payout, exploiting the popularity of the brand name to drive sales. The Resident Evil franchise is a shining example of this. Without the connection to the games, the movies would have been amazing. the concept was great.. it simply had nothing to do with the game other than character names and a few creatures ideas. Granted, the story of the games wasn't that complex, at least not until later games in the series, but the movies, while popular, are obviously just a branding concept, like Gatorade gum. (Look it up, it existed, and went over about as well as you think it would.)
    The next problem you get the artistic people involved in the scripting and filming. These people are hired by a company who doesn't care what they do to the source material, as long as it looks good. They don't wanna do something that has been done before, and decide to put their own twist to it, making it feel more of an original idea to them. the end result is a bastardized version of the original concept. Turns out that the only people who like the movies are those who aren't gamers and have no idea what the original was like.
    My opinion, if you are going to make a game movie, then for the love of god find a producer, directer, art director, and writing team that are GAMERS and are actually fans of the source material. Then we get something like Peter Jackson did with the Lord of the Rings movies, instead another awful Bloodrayne bomb.

    1. Very true. If the people involved in the project don't actually care for the source material their film is based on, it's practically guaranteed to piss fans off. And if they don't actually care for making good films in general, then it'll probably piss everyone off. XD

      I think that with time, more and more passionate gamers will find their way into the film industry and start heading these film productions themselves. After all, gaming as a hobby is growing at a rapid pace and influencing more people each year, not to mention we're now living through the first generation that has grown up with video games.

      Who knows? The upcoming Assassin's Creed, Need for Speed and Splinter Cell films might be good. Even if they aren't, I don't think we're TOO far from decent game-based films becoming a regular occurrence.

  23. Hmmm… I personally think Portal 2 would make a good movie, with its likeable and interesting (if small) cast of characters. I don&#039t know if there&#039s any directors out there who could pull that off, though. And people would be confused as to what was going on without backstory (because there&#039s not enough story for a Portal 1 movie) unless, like, Chell had amnesia and regained her memory as the story progressed.

  24. Hmmm… I personally think Portal 2 would make a good movie, with its likeable and interesting (if small) cast of characters. I don't know if there's any directors out there who could pull that off, though. And people would be confused as to what was going on without backstory (because there's not enough story for a Portal 1 movie) unless, like, Chell had amnesia and regained her memory as the story progressed.

  25. pretty much any game makes a bad movie unless they don’t use the story and just make a movie in the game’s universe with a diffrent story

  26. Shit, no. Don’t fuck with SotC. A film of Half-Life 2 (or 1, which I say that would be more interesting) is a great idea. But, people, please, Hollywood fucking sucks, and they DO NOT FUCKING KNOW how the FUCK to make a movie based in a game. Just give enough money to support a film made by fans of the game.

  27. Actually, a Half-Life movie would be a great idea if the main character was one of the other protagonists. I personally would love to see a movie based around Adrian Shepard, Barney Calhoun, or Eli Vance. But I do agree that if it were Gordon in the lime-light, the movie would probably be a flop. Unless the movie actually was the long awaited HL3, Gordon’s story should be left alone.

  28. GTA would be a good TV show

  29. Half life would make a terrible movie? try telling that to J.J. Abrams and Gabe Newell.

  30. bad robot has been talking with valve about half life movie and portal movie and call of duty black ops was written by the same guy who wrote the Nolan’s batman series so a movie writer wrote them and it more than shows. the absoulute worst problem with video game movies and why they turn out so terrible is cause they take the lead male protagonist that we know and love from the games and replace them with a female lead so the whole story changes like silent hill the second one meantions the dads new secret name is mason you know the hero from silent hill the movie’s are revolved around his wife and his child he is a side character, and resident evil chris redfield, and leon kennedy are the two names i associate with those games resident evil degeneration was actually a better film than the others and it was cgi i hate cgi movies

    1. ??
      The movies that actually crashed and burned the worst did not do that at all. Max Payne? That if any should have made a good movie, as the game was based on a very film noir and very linear story, but no. Hitman? Has anyone even seen the movie? The mentioned Mario with Bob Hoskins I have seen clips of and they alone give me convulsions. Oddly you have brought out the fact that only successful game based movies seem to have female protagonists, namely Tomb Raider, an indy Jones clone, but entertaining and made money; Resident Evil which made buckets of money – I think the best one is the first one but two is pretty watchable too. Silent Hill has I guess made enough money as it has spawned sequels, I have only seen one of the series which was visually very good but otherwise not so much.

  31. So, does Final Fantasy: Advent Children not count (particularly the “no RPG’s rule”)?

  32. Look at Nuka-Break and the Mini series made base on Dragon Age(Both were great by the way).

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